Rotator cuff injuries

What is the rotator cuff?

A rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that surround the shoulder joint.  The rotator cuff keeps the head of your arm bone (the humerus) firmly within the shoulder socket and allows you to raise and rotate your arm.

 

rotator-cuff-diagram

Common injuries

Injuries to the rotator cuff are common and can range from mild inflammation (tendinitis) to a complete tear in the tendon.  Pain may present in the shoulder as a dull ache and it may be difficult to move your arm up over your head and/or behind you.

The incidence of rotator cuff injuries does tend to increase with age due to normal wear and tear on the rotator cuff tendon and usually present as a tear in the tendon.

 

Injuries in younger people

Rotator cuff injuries can also occur at a younger age in professions that require repeated overhead movements such as painters and carpenters and in sports activities such as baseball and swimming.

Rotator cuff injuries can also present after a fall on the shoulder.

 

Types of rotator cuff tears

Tears can be either partial where there is one of the rotator cuff muscles tendon is frayed or damaged – or a complete tear where the tear goes all the way through the tendon.

rotator cuff tears

Recovering from a rotator cuff injury

The good news is that most people with an injury to the rotator cuff can manage their symptoms and make a full recovery with physiotherapy. Treatment depends on the type of injury but includes,

  • soft tissue therapy to release tight musculature,
  • exercise management to build up strength in the rotator cuff and other shoulder stabilisers and
  • avoiding overhead movements until the tendon heals.

Physiotherapy treatment may also include taping or a specific shoulder brace to unload the tendon.

 

Occasionally surgery may be required

If there is a substantial injury to the rotator cuff, surgery may be required.  If this is the case physiotherapy can also help with both your pre-operative and post-operative rehabilitation.

 

Do you need help with shoulder pain?

If so, contact us on (02)  4454 4588.

TeleHealth Physiotherapy Consultations – FAQs


 

What is TeleHealth Physiotherapy?

Telehealth physiotherapy is a video-based one-on-one consultation service provided by Strive Physiotherapy to patients who cannot attend the clinic.

 

 

 

Who is suitable for TeleHealth Physiotherapy?

This type of physiotherapy service is suitable for patients who:

  • are in remote locations, not near the clinic
  • have mobility issues
  • are undergoing self-isolation as a result of COVID 19.

 

What does a TeleHealth Physiotherapy consultation involve?

A TeleHealth physiotherapy consultation is ‘virtually’ the same as a clinic consultation.  Via video we will:

  • Assess muscle/joint/tissue restrictions; walking gait, functional movements; pain levels; swelling and bruising
  • Diagnose your injury/health condition based on the assessment and your case history
  • Treat your injury/health condition using a range of tools such as self-mobilisation/tissue release; home-based exercise; pain management/ swelling advice; showing you taping strategies to offload painful joints/tissue; education; and ordering and supplying essential & appropriate physiotherapy products for and to you to manage your injury/condition
  • Provide ongoing follow-up management and care of your injury/condition to keep you moving well.

 

Do I have to be an existing patient to book a TeleHealth Physiotherapy consultation?

No. We offer telehealth physiotherapy consultations to both new and existing patients.

 

How do I book a TeleHealth Physiotherapy consultation?

You can book by phoning reception on (02) 4454 4588 or book online and select ‘TeleHealth’ consultation.

 

Do I need special equipment for a TeleHealth consultation?

You will need:

  • Computer/iphone/ipad
  • Access to the internet
  • Email or mobile phone number so we can send you the link to download the software and your unique access code.

 

What is the charge for a TeleHealth consultation?

Initial TeleHealth physiotherapy consultations are $96 for 45 minutes. Follow-up TeleHealth consultations are $85 for 30 minutes.

 

Can I claim TeleHealth Physiotherapy through Medicare or Private Health Insurance?

Yes, you can claim telehealth physiotherapy consults both through PHI and Medicare. Please check with your PHI first for the amount they will rebate.

 

TeleHealth Physiotherapy is a viable, well established and evidence-based way to keep you moving well!

For further information and/or to book an appointment call us on 4454 4588 or book online.

 

Knee Pain

Knee pain is a common complaint among patients of all ages.

Knee pain may be the result of:

* an injury, such as a torn cartilage

* mechanical problems such as maltracking of the patella (kneecap)

* or a medical condition, such as osteoarthritis

 

 

The good news is that the majority of knee pain can be alleviated with physiotherapy and ongoing self care.

Symptoms of knee pain

The location and severity of knee pain may vary, depending on the cause. Generally, it will include one or more of the following:

  • Swelling and stiffness
  • Weakness or instability
  • Popping or crunching noises
  • Redness and/or warm to touch
  • Inability to straighten the knee

 

 

 

There are many different causes of knee pain

 

Injury

  • Tears to ACL and/or meniscus –  Loaded twisting actions of the knee, particularly changing direction awkwardly while running or other load-bearing activities can cause a tear to the ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) and or meniscus (cartilage between the knee).

 

  • Fractures – A fall on the knee or direct blow can break or dislocate the kneecap or bones that make up the knee joint.

 

  • Tendinitis – is inflammation of the one or more tendons of the knee. It is aggravated by movement, particularly going up and downstairs.  It is often due to either high volume or long-term repeated load on the tendon.  Tendinitis is common in runners. And, as we age, the tendons start to become more brittle, making them more vulnerable to increased loads.

 

  • Bursitis – There are 11 bursae (small fluid-filled sacs) around the knee joint.  They can become irritated with prolonged kneeling and/or mechanical irritation or a direct blow to the knee causing pain and swelling around the knee.

 

Mechanical problems

  • Hip/foot pain – Conditions of the hip and/or foot may alter the way you walk, placing more load on the knee joint.

 

  • Iliotibial Band  (ITB) Syndrome – The ITB is a band of connective tissue that extends from the outside of the hip to the outside of the knee.  It can tighten during activities such as running causing lateral knee pain.

 

Medical Conditions

Arthritis.  There are many types of arthritis but two are common causes of knee pain.

 

  • Osteoarthritis is due to wear and tear of the cartilage of the knee

 

  • Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune condition that causes pain and inflammation of multiple joints including the knee.

 

Managing knee pain

Due to the wide variety of causes, it is important to have your knee pain assessed early on by a physiotherapist to determine the source of the pain and implement the appropriate treatment.

This may include manual therapy, ultrasound, taping and bracing, exercise therapy and avoiding the aggravating movements.

 

Learn more

 

 

For more information call 9819 6151

Top tips for moving well and winter exercise 

Top tips for exercise in the colder months!

 

To avoid injury and illness during winter exercise and sport, you need a slightly different approach during the colder months than you do in summer.

 

 

 

Warm up

Warming up is essential in winter.  Your body takes longer to warm up during winter to ensure adequate blood flow to the muscles before you commence more vigorous exercise.

Warm up can consist of light jogging, dynamic warm-up exercises or a combination of both.  Allow 5-10 minutes to warm up before you commence your sport or exercise.

 

Wear warm layers

If you are exercising outside, make sure you wear warm clothing and/or layers so that you can appropriately change your layers to allow for body (and air temperature) changes.

Compression tights are a great investment for exercising in the winter months.  They enhance blood flow through the leg muscles, helping to prevent fatigue and joint stiffness.

Breathe in through your nose

Inhalation of colder air can cause your bronchial tubes to narrow. This can reduce the capacity of the mucous membranes to stay moist and is exacerbated if you breathe in through your mouth.

Breathing in through your nose gives incoming air an opportunity to be moistened and heated through the nasal mucosa and mouth.  IMPORTANT: If you are asthmatic, it is best to consult your GP regarding training in cold weather.

Cool down

Cooling down is an important part of your winter exercise program.  Cooling down exercises allow your muscles to gradually return to their optimal length-tension relationship and prevent venous pooling of blood in the lower extremities. They also allow your heart rate and breathing to return to a normal level and prevent a build-up of lactic acid in the muscles.

TIP: Make sure you put your layers back on before your cool down exercises to keep your body warm.

 

Learn more

The Psoas

The Psoas (Greek for loins) is a long muscle that attaches to both the lumbar spine and pelvis. The primary function of the Psoas is to lift the upper leg towards the body.

But did you know that it also helps bend the trunk sideways (lateral flexion) and helps you get up from a lying down position?

It is a key muscle used in running and also helps with movements at the hip joint.

Tightness in the psoas can lead to pain in the lower back as it can compress the lumbar discs when tight. It can also limit your trunk sideways movements when tight.

Irritation of the psoas can lead to groin and thigh pain.

 

Stretching your Psoas

The sequence below shows you how to do this stretch that will let you know if you have a tight psoas but also give your psoas a well-deserved stretch.

psoas-stretch

The Psoas stretch lengthens the muscles at the front of the hip.

  • To begin, ensure your rear knee is directly under your hip and your front knee is in line with your front heel.
  • Tuck your bottom under and lean forward.
  • For an extra stretch place your hands behind your head and slightly arch your upper back backwards.

More exercises

Click the type of exercise below.

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